Georgia Rhinoplasty

What is Georgia Rhinoplasty?

Rhinoplasty commonly known as a nose job, is a plastic surgery procedure for correcting and reconstructing the form, restoring the functions, and aesthetically enhancing the nose by resolving nasal trauma (blunt, penetrating, blast), congenital defect, respiratory impediment, or a failed primary rhinoplasty. In the surgeries—closed rhinoplasty and open rhinoplasty—an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist), a maxillofacial surgeon (jaw, face, and neck specialist), or a plastic surgeon creates a functional, aesthetic, and facially proportionate nose by separating the nasal skin and the soft tissues from the osseo-cartilaginous nasal framework, correcting them as required for form and function, suturing the incisions, and applying either a package or a stent, or both, to immobilize the corrected nose to ensure the proper healing of the surgical incision.

The plastic surgical correction of congenital and acquired abnormalities of the nose restores functional and aesthetic properties by the surgeon’s manipulations of the nasal skin, the subcutaneous (underlying) cartilage-and-bone support framework, and the mucous membrane lining. Technically, the plastic surgeon’s incisional approach classifies the nasal surgery either as an open rhinoplasty or as a closed rhinoplasty procedure. In open rhinoplasty, the surgeon makes a small, irregular incision to the columella, the fleshy, exterior-end of the nasal septum; this columellar incision is additional to the usual set of incisions for a nasal correction. In closed rhinoplasty, the surgeon performs every procedural incision endonasally (exclusively within the nose), and does not cut the columella.

A Georgia rhinoplastic correction can be performed on a patient who is under sedation, under general anaesthesia, or under local anaesthesia; initially, a local anaesthetic mixture of lidocaine and epinephrine is injected to numb the area, and temporarily reduce vascularity, thereby limiting any bleeding. Generally, the plastic surgeon first separates the nasal skin and the soft tissues from the osseo-cartilagenous nasal framework, and then corrects (reshapes) them as required, afterwards, sutures the incisions, and then applies either an external or an internal stent, and tape, to immobilize the newly reconstructed nose, and so facilitate the healing of the surgical cuts. Occasionally, the surgeon uses either an autologous cartilage graft or a bone graft, or both, in order to strengthen or to alter the nasal contour(s). The autologous grafts usually are harvested from the nasal septum, but, if it has insufficient cartilage (as can occur in a revision rhinoplasty), then either a costal cartilage graft (from the rib cage) or an auricular cartilage graft (concha from the ear) is harvested from the patient’s body. When the rhinoplasty requires a bone graft, it is harvested from either the cranium, the hips, or the rib cage; moreover, when neither type of autologous graft is available, a synthetic graft (nasal implant) is used to augment the nasal bridge.

In plastic surgical praxis, the term primary rhinoplasty denotes an initial (first-time) reconstructive, functional, or aesthetic corrective procedure. The term secondary rhinoplasty denotes the revision of a failed rhinoplasty, an occurrence in 5–20 per cent of rhinoplasty operations, hence a revision rhinoplasty. The corrections usual to secondary rhinoplasty include the cosmetic reshaping of the nose because of an unaddressed nasal fracture; a defective tip of the nose, i.e., pinched (too narrow), hooked (parrot beak), or flattened (pug nose); and the restoration of clear airways. Although most revision rhinoplasty procedures are “open approach”, such a correction is more technically complicated, usually because the nasal support structures either were deformed or destroyed in the primary rhinoplasty; thus the surgeon must re-create the nasal support with cartilage grafts harvested either from the ear (auricular cartilage graft) or from the rib cage (costal cartilage graft).

More Links to Consider:

http://www.plasticsurgery.org/cosmetic-procedures/rhinoplasty.html

http://www.webmd.com/beauty/nose-job/cosmetic-procedures-nose-job-rhinoplasty

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002983.htm

Videos on Rhinoplasty